A fatal disease has been confirmed as the cause of the deaths of 14 Hartford rabbits

A fatal disease has been confirmed as the cause of the deaths of 14 Hartford rabbits

Small, cramped cages were as far as the eye could see inside the 4-H rabbit shed at the Allen County Fairgrounds each year in Kansas. The magic of owning a rabbit or a bunny as a pet has never appealed to me, but I knew a couple of people who had raised them as pets, so the news I saw today would have sent those particular people into frantic anxiety.

According to a report by NBCCTthe Connecticut Department of Agriculture confirmed cases Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus type 2 (RHDV2)And the fact that it’s hard to pronounce sounds like sure agony. Those poor rabbits were in Hartford County and the disease was discovered after 13 of them died suddenly and then another two days later, bringing the total to 14, and tests confirmed the presence of RHDV2.

Joe on Unsplash

Joe on Unsplash

It is not always detectable immediately and sometimes the only sign of illness is sudden death. I searched Google for pictures of rabbits with the disease but chose not to display them. The funny thing is that I would be more inclined to show an image of a human with some kind of abnormality or disease than a cute and cuddly animal, is that weird? But, I digress… This is a cute jackrab…

Mike Lewinsky on Unsplash

Mike Lewinsky on Unsplash

Both domestic and wild rabbits can become ill and the source of the outbreak is being investigated and appears to be isolated at the moment. RHDV2 has been detected in domestic rabbits in neighboring New York and New Jersey as well as several southwestern states. So far, this is only one case, and it does not appear to have spread, but the Department of Agriculture is urging rabbits to maintain appropriate measures to prevent the disease. Don’t worry, it doesn’t transmit to humans.

The Department of Agriculture recommends these practices:

  • Do not allow hares or pet rabbits from other locations to come into contact with your rabbits or into your facility or home.

  • Do not allow visitors in rabbits or allow them to handle pet rabbits without protective clothing (including coats, shoe covers, hair covers, and gloves).

  • Always wash your hands with warm, soapy water before entering the rabbit area, after removing protective clothing and when leaving the rabbit area.

  • Do not offer fresh rabbits from unknown or unreliable sources.

  • If you bring rabbits from outside into your facility or home, keep them separate from your existing rabbits for at least 30 days. Use separate equipment for newly acquired or sick rabbits to avoid spreading disease.

  • Sterilize all equipment and cages transported inside or outside the premises before returning them to the rabbit’s residence.

We seem to have a lot of things to deal with these days, and if you’re a rabbit owner, here’s one more thing to deal with. If you have rabbits, good luck and be safe. Thank you for spending time with the kids and see you again soon.

5 abandoned amusement parks in Connecticut

We are going to look at 5 amusement parks that no longer exist in Connecticut. They are, in no particular order, Savin Rock theme park in West Haven, Suburban Park in Unionville, Wildwood Park in Dayville, East Lyme’s Golden Spur Park, and Roton Point Park in Rowayton. All in all, at one point, it was a thriving and well-nourished part of Connecticut’s amusement park industry.

Attended the perfect wedding at Telly Foster Farm in Brewster

5 abandoned amusement parks in Connecticut

We are going to look at 5 amusement parks that no longer exist in Connecticut. They are, in no particular order, Savin Rock theme park in West Haven, Suburban Park in Unionville, Wildwood Park in Dayville, East Lyme’s Golden Spur Park, and Roton Point Park in Rowayton. All in all, at one point, it was a thriving and well-nourished part of Connecticut’s amusement park industry.


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